Ein Schwerpunktprogramm der DFG

PARCEL


  • ¹ Professor Dr. Thomas Basché
    Institut für Physikalische Chemie
    Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
    Mainz
  • Professor Dr. Ingrid Hilger
    Institut für Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie
    Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
    Jena
  • Professor Dr. Andreas Janshoff
    Institut für Physikalische Chemie
    Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
    Mainz
  • Professor Dr. Carsten Sönnichsen
    Institut für Physikalische Chemie
    Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
    Mainz
  • ² Professor Dr. Wolfgang Tremel
    Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry
    Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz
    Mainz
1 Phase 1: until Decembre 2010
2 Phase 2: since January 2011

Interactions of Janus Particles with Membranes and Cells from the Human Blood Compartment

The consortium addresses the interaction of inorganic nanoparticles with model membranes and human living cells from the blood compartment. Nanoparticles will be made from metals and semiconductors whereby chemical composition, size, shape and surface chemistry of the particles can be varied. Therefore, all of the parameters expected to have an impact on the interaction of nanoparticles with biological tissue can be controlled. Our comprehensive approach covers particle adhesion, cell entry, and biochemical implications of nanoparticle exposure. We expect to gain insight into the causes of cytotoxicity and how these effects can be related to the specific interactions of nanoparticles with biomembranes and to their intra-cellular fate. Accordingly, we will study membrane-particle interactions by various means including single particle tracking to elucidate possible mechanisms and pathways of cellular particle up-take. The impact of nanoparticles on cellular functions will be assessed by viability and motility assays. These studies will be complemented by investigation of the biochemical mechanisms of nanoparticle mediated cytotoxicity. The envisioned findings will allow tailoring surface functionalization and particle morphology to avoid (or enhance) particle uptake by human cells while maintaining the originally intended functionality of the particles.